Lyndon B. Johnson Hospitality


The U.S. Presidency and Political Hospitality - 1776-1976


The U.S. Presidency and Political Hospitality - 1776-1976

 Lyndon B. Johnson Hospitality Papers


Mary Edith Wilroy  served as Blair House Manager for the entire term of the Johnson Administration.

On President Truman:   In April, at the invitation of President Johnson, former President Truman was at the Blair House overnight.  He had come for the annual Gridiron Club Dinner given by the Washington Press corps.  In addition to good food, the dinner always features a song and dance performance that gently and not so gently ribs Washington's famous people.  Mr. Truman arrived on Saturday  Our regular butlers were not available, so I hired a butler with the usual security clearance.  He couldn't have been a security risk since the poor fellow turned out to be almost totally deaf.  Luckily I discovered quickly that he couldn't even hear the front door bell.  During the entire visit the parlor maid or i had to be nearby, ready to open the door for any callers.  Mr. Truman followed his usual routine, rising early on Sunday morning for one of his famous morning walks.  He was a accompanied by a small group from the press and was hailed by passerby who were thrilled to see the former President striding by in the manner that had become familiar to everyone all over the country.  When he was recognized by people who called, "Hello Mr. President," or "How are you, Harry?"  he would stop and shake hands and chat with them for a few minutes.    Then he came back, had a leisurely breakfast, and left almost immediately for the trip back to Independence.  Since it was a Sunday the front gate was locked as soon as he left, and a small staff was tidying things up inside when all of a sudden the side door bell rang.  Because I was in my office I was closest to the door.  I went to see who it could possibly be at that time of day on Sunday.  I opened the door and there stood  President Truman.  He had come back to use the bathroom.  I showed him the the elevator and Rigoberto accompanied him upstairs to the room he had vacated only about a half hour before.  When he came back down, President Truman apologized and said he was sorry to have been "such a nuisance."  I, in turn,  apologized for the locked front gate.  Graciously he said he didn't mind using the side door at all/  It saved him from walking up the front steps.  But we never again locked the front gate after a departing visitor until we were sure they arrived at the airport.


The U.S. Presidency and Political Hospitality - 1776-1976
Former President Lyndon B. Johnson 
writes Mary Edith on his stay at the Blair House



On President Johnson:  In February 1964 I was invited to a diplomatic reception.  I received hundreds of invitations every year to all sorts of events, and although I was always pleased to have been included I just couldn't go to all of them.  I did try to accept White House invitations whenever possible, however, and on this occasion I got to dance with Washington's most sought after dancing partners, the President.  The next day the newspapers were calling to ask how I felt about dancing with the President, he was a good dancer, and other weighty questions of that sort.  I couldn't really tell them if he was a good dancer or not.  The idea of dancing with the President had me dancing on air, I just followed his lead, and before I knew it, the music had ended and I was back at the side talking to Robin.  It was really a great treat for me and something I still tell my grandchildren about.

The U.S. Presidency and Political Hospitality - 1776-1976

 Former First Lady  Johnson 
writes Mary Edith on her visit to Texas

Lady Bird Johnson:  Mrs. Johnson, now the first lady, came for lunch with Robin and several other members of the Fine Arts Committee for a formal tour of the house so that she could see the progress that had been made.  Although she was an enthusiastic honorary charman of the Fine Arts Committee, she now had so many duties as First Lady that she was unable to do much of the actual work on the committee.  She will probably always be better known for what she did to help make America's landscape  more beautiful.  She encouraged people all over the country to plant flowers and clean up neighborhoods.  To set an example for such projects elsewhere, she was responsible for many of the lovely plantings of spring flowers that bloom in Washington Parks.

The U.S. Presidency and Political Hospitality - 1776-1976

Mary Edith Wilroy and her note at the Blair House - 1964


The papers are currently housed at the Loyola University Honors Program and are subjects of academic study under the direction of  its Director,   Naomi Yavneh, Ph.D.


Naomi Yavneh, Ph.D.

Director, University Honors Program &  Office of Undergraduate Research 

Loyola University New Orleans
University Honors Program
6363 St. Charles Ave.
Campus Box 75
New Orleans, LA 70118-6195

Phone:  (504) 865-2708
Fax: (504) 865-2709
email: yavneh@loyno.edu





Chart Comparing Presidential Powers 
of  America's Four United Republics - Click Here

United Colonies and States First Ladies
1774-1788


United Colonies Continental Congress
President
18th Century Term
Age
09/05/74 – 10/22/74
29
Mary Williams Middleton (1741- 1761) Deceased
Henry Middleton
10/22–26/74
n/a
05/20/ 75 - 05/24/75
30
05/25/75 – 07/01/76
28
United States Continental Congress
President
Term
Age
07/02/76 – 10/29/77
29
Eleanor Ball Laurens (1731- 1770) Deceased
Henry Laurens
11/01/77 – 12/09/78
n/a
Sarah Livingston Jay (1756-1802)
12/ 10/78 – 09/28/78
21
Martha Huntington (1738/39–1794)
09/29/79 – 02/28/81
41
United States in Congress Assembled
President
Term
Age
Martha Huntington (1738/39–1794)
03/01/81 – 07/06/81
42
07/10/81 – 11/04/81
25
Jane Contee Hanson (1726-1812)
11/05/81 - 11/03/82
55
11/03/82 - 11/02/83
46
Sarah Morris Mifflin (1747-1790)
11/03/83 - 11/02/84
36
11/20/84 - 11/19/85
46
11/23/85 – 06/06/86
38
Rebecca Call Gorham (1744-1812)
06/06/86 - 02/01/87
42
02/02/87 - 01/21/88
43
01/22/88 - 01/29/89
36

Constitution of 1787
First Ladies
President
Term
Age
April 30, 1789 – March 4, 1797
57
March 4, 1797 – March 4, 1801
52
Martha Wayles Jefferson Deceased
September 6, 1782  (Aged 33)
n/a
March 4, 1809 – March 4, 1817
40
March 4, 1817 – March 4, 1825
48
March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829
50
December 22, 1828 (aged 61)
n/a
February 5, 1819 (aged 35)
n/a
March 4, 1841 – April 4, 1841
65
April 4, 1841 – September 10, 1842
50
June 26, 1844 – March 4, 1845
23
March 4, 1845 – March 4, 1849
41
March 4, 1849 – July 9, 1850
60
July 9, 1850 – March 4, 1853
52
March 4, 1853 – March 4, 1857
46
n/a
n/a
March 4, 1861 – April 15, 1865
42
February 22, 1862 – May 10, 1865
April 15, 1865 – March 4, 1869
54
March 4, 1869 – March 4, 1877
43
March 4, 1877 – March 4, 1881
45
March 4, 1881 – September 19, 1881
48
January 12, 1880 (Aged 43)
n/a
June 2, 1886 – March 4, 1889
21
March 4, 1889 – October 25, 1892
56
June 2, 1886 – March 4, 1889
28
March 4, 1897 – September 14, 1901
49
September 14, 1901 – March 4, 1909
40
March 4, 1909 – March 4, 1913
47
March 4, 1913 – August 6, 1914
52
December 18, 1915 – March 4, 1921
43
March 4, 1921 – August 2, 1923
60
August 2, 1923 – March 4, 1929
44
March 4, 1929 – March 4, 1933
54
March 4, 1933 – April 12, 1945
48
April 12, 1945 – January 20, 1953
60
January 20, 1953 – January 20, 1961
56
January 20, 1961 – November 22, 1963
31
November 22, 1963 – January 20, 1969
50
January 20, 1969 – August 9, 1974
56
August 9, 1974 – January 20, 1977
56
January 20, 1977 – January 20, 1981
49
January 20, 1981 – January 20, 1989
59
January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993
63
January 20, 1993 – January 20, 2001
45
January 20, 2001 – January 20, 2009
54
January 20, 2009 to date
45




Book a primary source exhibit and a professional speaker for your next event by contacting Historic.us today. Our Clients include many Fortune 500 companies, associations, non-profits, colleges, universities, national conventions, pr and advertising agencies. As the leading exhibitor of primary sources, many of our clients have benefited from our historic displays that are designed to entertain and educate your target audience. Contact us to learn how you can join our "roster" of satisfied clientele today!



Historic.us

 
A Non-profit Corporation

Primary Source Exhibits

2000 Louisiana Avenue | Venue 15696
New Orleans, Louisiana, 70115

727-771-1776 | Exhibit Inquiries

202-239-1774 | Office

Dr. Naomi and Stanley Yavneh Klos, Principals

Naomi@Historic.us
Stan@Historic.us

Primary Source exhibits are available for display in your community. The costs range from $1,000 to $35,000 depending on length of time on loan and the rarity of artifacts chosen. 

Website: www.Historic.us



Historic Pillars of the Republican Party - GOP Foundational Legislation that Encourages & Safeguards U.S. Public Education, Social Justice, Conservation and Fiscal Responsibility. "Imitation is the sincerest form of change and it reaches its political pinnacle when others, especially the opposition, assert your ideas and laws as their own." - Stan Klos - Please Visit Republicanism.us

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.